Category Archives: Story Ideas

The Novel Coronavirus and Your Autistic Child

Dr. Lynette Louise offers tips to help relieve worry and ease health risks from COVID-19 when your child has autism.

 

Simi Valley, CA, March 16, 2020  – Every day of every year we work to take care of our health and the health of our loved ones. During times of increased risk it often feels as though we have to become professional virus/bacteria bodyguards, with a side gig in medical research, in order to keep the illnesses at bay.

For those of us with certain special needs or habits; compulsions, stims, sensory needs, and challenged immune systems; it can be doubly challenging.

Dr. Lynette Louise (“The Brain Broad”) is an international brain change and behavior expert. She is also the mother of eight now grown children, six adopted, four with autism and other cognitive disabilities, who has developed ways to help all children, regardless of ability or special needs, grow healthy and she would like to share some tips with you.

  • WATER FUN AND PLAYING WITH FOOD – Now (during the global concern of COVID – 19) is not the time to deny handwashing or other water play. Yes, often we want to encourage or teach our autistic loved ones to do less with water, to find other passions for play, to not need water so much. (NOTE: Not all autistic individuals are drawn to water but most are. And when they are averse to water it often has to do with a traumatic/controlling behavioral modification caused experience that complicates their relationship with water.) However, when highly contagious illnesses are giving you and those around you legitimate concerns, it’s time to switch your focus and add some soap. Use water as reward. Encourage the water play and explain why. (NOTE: Regardless of whether or not your loved one with autism seems to understand your explanation, they are entitled to it. Also, they are understanding that you have a reason.) Don’t frighten your family, but be honest about why you are allowing more soapy water than usual. For people who have dry skin, find antibacterial lotions for sensory comfort. Have fun with it!

Additionally, follow your child’s impulses. if your child has a habit of playing with strong-smelling foods, like garlic, and lemons allow it. They are teaching you something. Foods like garlic, lemon, vinegar, coconut oil or honey, are non-toxic antibacterial/germ-killing ways to keep clean. Don’t disallow these habits for now, though in the sticky case of honey you’ll understandably want to be limited even in allowing, but do explain the reason. Then follow with a little water play; your hands too.

 

  • INCLUDE THE ENTIRE FAMILY – Don’t make the all too common mistake of giving only the autistic individual new ways. Be sure to shift everyone’s habits and talk about the fun of keeping healthy from contagion. Some people may still have to go to work or school. When arriving home make a show of washing hands, changing clothes, not chewing your nails. Be sure to use a proactive energy rather than a fearful one. Children on the spectrum easily slip into anxiety and panic that will make keeping them germ-free harder. Be careful not to make the outside world sound overly dangerous, even in a playful way. Watch your tone, choose your words carefully (“Phew! I’m going to quickly wash my hands in case I accidentally touched that germ!” is better than, “I’ve got to wash my hands quick! That germ could have been anywhere out there!”), remember that we still want to help our autistic children and friends feel accepted and comfortable in the outside world. Have the entire family get involved in similar ways as the person with autism. If they are playing with water, play with water too!

 

  • ATTITUDE IS KEY – Getting enough sleep and reducing stress are of great importance to your immune system. And having a healthy immune system is always a good idea. If you allow yourself to become more afraid and on edge every time you touch your face or your child wipes her hands on dirty surfaces, you might yell or speak of habits as though they are bad or wrong in ways you otherwise had patience for. Don’t! Have an attitude of learning, fun, and togetherness. Explain why handwashing and water play are more frequent for now, be honest with your child, but keep the bigger picture and long-range goals in mind. You want everyone healthy now, but also emotionally healthy later. Many people with autism and other cognitive challenges already have germ fears and phobias, so do your best to be truthful without causing bigger challenges for their futures.

 

  • OF COURSE, AVOID CROWDS – Particularly with autistic individuals that touch everything and put things in or near their mouths. There is the obvious reason that they will be at greater risk of not appropriately avoiding contamination, but also it is a good time to avoid the fears and judgments of others. People are on high alert and nervous, so it’s not the best environment. Of course, when you do have to venture out do your best to remember tip three: attitude is key. Bring that knowledge, as well as lemons, garlic, and sanitizer, with you.

 

COVID – 19 is highly contagious and you don’t want your family to confront it. But with these tips offered by Dr. Lynette Louise, “The Brain Broad,” international expert and mom, you can help your family stay healthy while also taking advantage of the opportunity to teach hygiene, flexibility with routines, and have a little fun with food and water.

Please reach out to The Brain Broad for more tips and ideas for helping your autistic child stay healthy during this time of worldwide worry while gaining skills, rather than regressing.

AVAILABLE FOR INTERVIEWS

CONTACT: Dr. Lynette Louise – Lynette Louise, D.Sc., Ph.D. ABD
www.lynettelouise.com/ www.brainbody.net

EMAIL: crazy2sane@gmail.com / lynette@lynettelouise.com
PHONE: 713-213-7682

HALLOWEEN: The Holiday Made for Autism (With These Important Tips)

Spooky and wild. Scary and different. Kind of like learning that your family is now going to perk up and listen every time they hear the word autism. That doesn’t mean every day is like Halloween for these families. It isn’t. But Halloween can be an excellent opportunity for playfully fun learning’s.

Global autism expert, speaker/performer, author and—most importantly mom—Lynette Louise can help your audience (with or without autistic children) get the most out of this boo-tiful opportunity. Some of the actionable and perhaps overlooked treasures your audience will learn:

Imagination Appreciation: It’s often said that autistic kids have no imagination. Yet one won’t sleep without her clock pillow and another wants only to line up his trains and dinosaurs. What do we ‘imagine’ they are thinking? Halloween is the night for exploring and discovering who they want to be and what that looks like to them. With make-up and masks comes a chance to shape imagination. Teaching appropriate imaginative play is lurking…

Awareness in your Neighborhood: One of the ‘scary’ truths about autism is that often families avoid outings and teaching opportunities due to a lack of awareness and understanding in the world outside autism spectrum disorder. Halloween is an excellent time to introduce your quirky selves to the—let’s face it—curious neighbors. Autism awareness in your neighborhood can offer safety and friendship. They probably aren’t as scary as you think… and neither are you!

Social Skills: Whether your child is verbal, non-verbal, echolaliac or only interested in calendar dates, door to door small talk (or if your child is more comfortable, handing out candy to visiting ghouls) is a once in a year opportunity to teach spooky social skills without too much pressure, involved in parallel play there is no need for sophisticated interaction. And, there is the immediate reward of candy!

RE: Candy and its negative effect on our kids, esp. those on a special diet. Lynette will give your audience tips on how to deal with this very real issue, but the bottom line is that experience and teaching opportunities most often outweigh the negative side effects of an evening with gluten and sugar.

Your audience knows their own children’s challenges and strengths. Lynette will help them take advantage of this spooky night (and the days leading up to it) with intention and the important skill of fun learning! Together we can take a step toward taking the ‘scary’ out of autism! HAPPY HALLOWEEN!

Global mental health expert, Lynette Louise, raised eight children –six were adopted and four of them were on the spectrum of autism. She was able to guide all but one out of autism and into independence. Lynette travels internationally, performing and speaking on the subject of autism and the efficacy of neurofeedback (biofeedback for the brain). Offering play therapy, family dynamics counseling and neurofeedback– she effectively helps parents become confident experts in their family’s healing. She is the author of the inspirational and honest new book MIRACLES ARE MADE: A Real Life Guide to Autism and host of the popular WebTalk.net radio show A NEW SPIN ON AUTISM: ANSWERS! Her one woman musical comedy show CRAZY TO SANE raises awareness –and laughter –around the world and her international docu-series (airs on The Autism Channel) FIX IT IN FIVE with LYNETTE LOUISE aka THE BRAIN BROAD offers FREE help to families with fun, kindness and concrete answers many types of brain disorders!

Contact: Lynette Louise, The Brain Broad- Doubly Board Certified in Neurofeedback, working on PhD in Psychophysiology at Saybrook University 713-213-7682, mom4evermore@juno.com, www.lynettelouise.com www.brainbody.net

Lynette Louise aka THE BRAIN BROAD Shares The Science of Purposeful Play~Raising Autism Awareness Every Day

April is Autism Awareness Month, and while the disability world gets busy looking for ways to raise much needed awareness, international mental health expert (specializing in autism) Lynette Louise aka THE BRAIN BROAD is playing with people to balance their brains. She travels the globe teaching brain science and purposeful play to the disability community using music, comedy, writing, speaking, and hands on outreach work.

Lynette’s most recent book is based on the true tale of one such outreach.

The WingMaker is about a young girl with Cerebral Palsy who was part of a large and loving family. Unfortunately her disability was extreme and the family was afraid to play with her, for fear she’d get hurt. In fact, she had been hurt once, and so her life became about maintenance rather than fun. Fortunately, with the help of Lynette, the family learned to play with purpose. With neurofeedback also added to the home everyone grew healthier and gained skills. The WingMaker–a beautiful rhyming picture book– shares this journey and more with it’s readers, while also revealing deeper truths and actionable play tips they can implement in their own home.

This autism awareness month, Lynette would love to share the value of purposeful play and neurofeedback with your audience as well! In an interview with Lynette Louise your audience will learn:

~The effect of environment on brain health. Not only the toxic or non-toxic chemicals you find in your home, but also your chosen colors, sounds, and attitude!

~What neurofeedback is, and why choosing it over medication is almost always the healthiest and most effective choice.

~The difference between teaching skills and rewarding with play, and playing to teach skills.

~Why getting to know people with disabilities as friends, rather than as folks to feel sorry for, can be the greatest gift you give yourself this season. Perhaps this year!

Lynette Louise aka THE BRAIN BROAD is an engaging, passionate, and knowledgeable guest. Just watching her share what she knows is a powerful first step in the direction of understanding purposeful play!

Short bio:
Lynette Louise aka The Brain Broad is an international mental health and parenting expert, specializing in autism. She is a speaker, author, performer, popular podcast host, neurofeedback & autism expert, and creator/host/therapist for the international reality series FIX IT IN FIVE with LYNETTE LOUISE aka THE BRAIN BROAD, now showing on The Autism Channel. Her one woman show, Crazy to Sane, invites laughter, learning, and toe tapping fun globally FREE every year in April (Autism Awareness Month). She is also the single mother of eight now grown children; Six were adopted and four were on the autism spectrum. Only one of her sons retains his label and remains dependent.

Contact Lynette Louise aka THE BRAIN BROAD: Doubly Certified in Neurofeedback and working on her PhD in Psychology with a specialty in Psychophysiology at Saybrook University
EMAIL: mom4evermore@juno.com PHONE: 713-213-7682

# # #

Learning Love with Autism

For many of us there is a common theme that weaves itself into our lifelong script. These themes are not only great for call backs or silly t-shirts, but also offer tailor made opportunities for life lessons. In the life of Lynette Louise, that common theme is autism. Global autism expert, Lynette Louise aka THE BRAIN BROAD travels the world sharing with humor and honesty the skills necessary for connecting with our autistic children. She also examples how these skills will help us effectively connect with our other family members, co-workers, community, and our world.

This Valentine’s Day Lynette would like to share with your audience some lessons of the heart that autism challenges us to learn:

Connecting: In all of our relationships there is a tendency to pay attention to the things going on around us, to try changing, stopping or encouraging them. With autism these symptoms are clues that we can waste time working on, or we can follow to connect with the child or adult within. Lynette calls this the ‘Law of Distraction’ and reminds us, “You keep what you keep your eye on.” In other words, when we connect to our loved one and avoid the distractions, the symptoms become the small things and the cause of them can become clear.

Knowing: We know that we love our kids. However, with ASD it’s hard to know that they love us back. Lack of eye contact, fear of touch etc. can make knowing a little bit challenging. Lynette can share how to spot the clues that our autistic loved ones are feeling something special, which bleeds out as a reminder in all our relationships. A reminder that knowing doesn’t come from seeing them do what we would do, but rather what they would do!

Showing: Who’d have thought fear of rejection was something parents would have to worry about with their kids? But with ASD it runs rampant. That’s because in trying to show love our way, we often bump into their challenges, get pushed away and feel rejected. Unfortunately many parents, out of respect for their children, stop showing. Don’t! Lynette can share how to show love with your autistic loved one, which will in turn remind you how to comfortably show it everywhere else!

Whether or not you live with autism on a daily basis, everyone can enjoy its sweet answers. Autism is a controversial and challenging disorder that asks us to think outside the box and challenge the social norm. Lynette Louise is gifted at exampling the balance between acceptance and raising the bar. And that, my friends, is love! Happy Valentine’s Day!

Lynette Louise raised eight children – four of them were on the spectrum of autism. She was able to guide all but one out of autism and into independence. Lynette travels internationally, performing and speaking on the subject of autism and the efficacy of purposeful play and neurofeedback. She is the author of the inspirational and honest book MIRACLES ARE MADE: A Real Life Guide to Autism and host of the WebTalk.net radio show A NEW SPIN ON AUTISM: ANSWERS, and creator/host of FIX IT IN FIVE with LYNETTE LOUISE aka THE BRAIN BROAD, now showing on The Autism Channel. Her one woman musical comedy show CRAZY TO SANE raises awareness –and laughter –around the world.

Contact Lynette Louise aka THE BRAIN BROAD: Doubly Board Certified in Neurofeedback and working on her PhD in Psychology with a specialty in Psychophysiology at Saybrook University 713-213-7682, mom4evermore@juno.com, www.lynettelouise.com www.brainbody.net

HOW DADS DO IT!

Why a dad’s natural tendencies are a gift to his autistic child

It’s not uncommon in today’s household to have two working parents. However, it is uncommon for dad to feel like an equal when it comes to raising the kids. Especially when a child in the family has been diagnosed with autism. Perhaps because mom feels like it’s her job to step up to the plate or because it’s often believed that maternal instinct will kick in and mom will know best. Whatever the reason, everyone is missing out. The child as much as the parents.

Father’s Day is a wonderful time to celebrate the many gifts of dads. For the autistic child, those gifts will not only help to forge a happy childhood and fond memories of Father child activities but will also play a significant role in the potential healing of several of autisms many physiological challenges.

Lynette can share with your audiences the why’s and how’s while offering the gift of intentional play. With humor and perhaps a quick game of catch, she will share with your audience these surprising truths:

Gross Motor Skills: Dads tend to play gross motor games which works out the child’s balance and copying skills. It is extremely common for autistic people to have poorly developed cerebellums and mirror neurons in their brains. These games will actually encourage their growth and development. Also, playing them makes being together fun!

Blah, Blah, Blah: Dads are less inclined to talk about feelings and since that is one of the later learning’s to come on line for autistic kids, the pressure is reduced and connections born. In other words, not talking about their feelings encourages them to feel them!

Ally-Ooop: Dads love to throw their kids into the air. This is great for cerebellum healing. Much cheaper than a cerebellum chair it does the same basic thing. It’s fun and it’s free!

Specific Games and their Healing Habits

Playing Catch… Great for depth perception and responding.

Chase Games… Great for focus and fun and spontaneous speech.

Nothing is as rewarding as watching your children grow and learn, especially when you see your part to play. Father’s Day is a day to recognize dads part. Your audiences will be thrilled and inspired to play passionately with all of their children!

Global autism expert, Lynette Louise, raised eight children –six adopted and four of whom were on the spectrum of autism. She was able to guide all but one out of autism and into independence. Lynette travels internationally, performing and speaking on the subject of autism and the efficacy of neurofeedback (biofeedback for the brain). Offering play therapy, family dynamics counseling and neurofeedback– she effectively helps parents become confident experts in their family’s healing. She is the author of the inspirational and honest new book MIRACLES ARE MADE: A Real Life Guide to Autism.

Contact: Lynette Louise MS, BCN-T, CBS PhD in M.O.M, 713-213-7682,mom4evermore@juno.com, www.lynettelouise.com www.brainbody.net

ARE YOU AUTISTIC?

Maybe… But Probably Not. 2

Crowded holiday malls, strangers at parties with red and green flashing lights, routines thrown out the frosted window for out of town guests and spontaneous caroling. This is a very challenging time for kids and adults on the autism spectrum. It’s a very challenging time for their families. But, isn’t it somewhat stressful for everyone? How is it that these common challenges are just something that some of us have to buck up and handle, while others are given labels like ‘Autistic’ or ‘Sensory Integration Disorder’ and then offered special Santa’s with short lines and tolerant elves? Global autism expert, author and podcast host Lynette Louise MS, CBN-T, CBS would like to explain.

With a little brain science and a lot of easily understood analogies, Lynette will shed light on these whispered questions for your audience, hopefully allowing for a little more understanding and awareness this season! Here is a taste of what she can share (sorry, no eggnog!):

Communication Conundrum: Everyone has topics of interest. We all get passionate about some issues and bored by others. When it’s said that people on the spectrum of autism have a communication disorder, no one gets confused by calling non-verbal or echolalia a disorder, but the inability to find interest in new topics does have eyebrows rising. Lynette can explain how the high delta frequency (low wave) in an autistic persons brain creates not the lack of desire, but lack of ability to share the interest.

The Spectrum-Revealed: Autism is a developmental, whole brain disorder. The brain frequency anomalies and sensory overload make interacting with the world difficult to varying degrees . So, although you can meet one autistic person who is non-verbal, humming and grinning happily as he eats out of the trash, and another who will make eye contact, chat intelligently about the state capitols and remember to say things like ‘nice to meet you’, the common element remains: a developmental, whole brain disorder.

Yet, there’s improvement with therapy?: Yup! Because our brains respond to feedback, we can encourage brain wave activity and neuronal growth with intention.

Lynette Louise will lend her passion and knowledge to revealing the difference between being a little bit quirky or shy, and being on the autism spectrum. Perhaps your hosts can share their strange habits and quirks with Lynette and she can explain why they aren’t –or are!—autistic. It’s lovely to spread awareness over the holidays. Even more fun to spread answers and understanding!

Lynette Louise raised eight children – four of them were on the spectrum of autism. She was able to guide all but one out of autism and into independence. Lynette travels internationally, performing and speaking on the subject of autism and the efficacy of neurofeedback (biofeedback for the brain). She is the author of the inspirational and honest new book MIRACLES ARE MADE: A Real Life Guide to Autism and host of the WebTalk.net radio show A NEW SPIN ON AUTISM: ANSWERS! Her one woman musical comedy show CRAZY TO SANE raises awareness –and laughter –around the world.

Contact: Lynette Louise MS, BCN-T, CBS PhD in M.O.M, 713-213-7682, mom4evermore@juno.com, www.lynettelouise.com www.brainbody.net

Learning Love with Autism

For many of us there is a common theme that weaves itself into our lifelong script. These themes are not only great for call backs or silly t-shirts, but also offer tailor made opportunities for life lessons. In the world of Lynette Louise, that common theme is autism. Global autism expert, Lynette Louise MS, BCN-T, CBS, travels the world sharing with humor and honesty the skills necessary for connecting with our autistic children. She also examples how these skills will help us effectively connect with our other family members, co-workers, community and our world.

This Valentine’s Day Lynette would like to share with your audience some lessons of the heart that autism challenges us to learn:

  • Connecting: In all of our relationships there is a tendency to pay attention to the things going on around us, to try changing, stopping or encouraging them. With autism these symptoms are clues that we can waste time working on, or we can follow to connect with the child or adult within. Lynette calls this the ‘Law of Distraction’ and reminds us, ‘You keep what you keep your eye on’. In other words, when we connect to our loved one and avoid the distractions, the symptoms become the small things and the cause of them can become clear.
  • Knowing: We know that we love our kids. However, with ASD it’s hard to know if they love us back. Lack of eye contact, fear of touch etc. can make knowing a little bit challenging. Lynette can share how to spot the clues that our autistic loved ones are feeling something special, which bleeds out as a reminder in all our relationships. A reminder that knowing doesn’t come from seeing them do what we would do, but rather what they would do!
  • Showing: Who’d have thought fear of rejection was something parents would have to worry about with their kids? But with ASD it runs rampant. That’s because in trying to show love our way, we often bump into their challenges, get pushed away and feel rejected. Unfortunately many parents, out of respect for their children, stop showing. Don’t! Lynette can share how to show love with your autistic loved one, which will in turn remind you how to comfortably show it everywhere else!

Whether or not you live with autism on a daily basis, everyone can enjoy its sweet answers. Autism is a controversial and challenging disorder that asks us to think outside the box and challenge the social norm. Lynette Louise is gifted at exampling the balance between acceptance and raising the bar. And that, my friends, is love! Happy Valentine’s Day!

Lynette Louise raised eight children – four of them were on the spectrum of autism. She was able to guide all but one out of autism and into independence. Lynette travels internationally, performing and speaking on the subject of autism and the efficacy of neurofeedback. She is the author of the inspirational and honest book MIRACLES ARE MADE: A Real Life Guide to Autism and host of the WebTalk.net radio show A NEW SPIN ON AUTISM: ANSWERS! Her one woman musical comedy show CRAZY TO SANE raises awareness –and laughter –around the world.

Contact: Lynette Louise MS, BCN-T, CBS PhD in M.O.M, 713-213-7682, mom4evermore@juno.com, www.lynettelouise.com www.brainbody.net

STAND UP COMEDY—FUNNILY…

TEACHING SOCIAL SKILLS TO THE SOCIALLY CHALLENGED

A stand- up comedian gets up on stage before a room full (or empty!) of strangers, and for at least five unforgiving minutes, tries to make everyone laugh. This is unlike any true, appropriate social situation and yet the skills necessary to become comfortable and get consistent laughs on stage are the same as the skills needed to become comfortable in a real life social scene. For people who have been unable to learn social skills within a group, in the ‘normal’ fashion, stand-up comedy can be the answer.

Global autism expert Lynette Louise knows these lessons well. While raising eight kids on her own (six adopted, four of whom were on the spectrum of autism) she paid the bills while performing karaoke and stand-up comedy. She often jokes that she would never have adopted so many kids if she hadn’t been a little crazy herself. In her one woman musical comedy CRAZY TO SANE, she shares her personal journey with honesty and hilarity. Lynette will happily surprise your audience with these interesting facts:

  • Confused in Conversation: Why was a joke funny yesterday but today everyone looks at you strangely? For people with social difficulties (i.e. autism) it’s hard to generalize. Understanding the differences between how a comment (or joke) was delivered, who’s in the room etc, while in a group is often overwhelming. Without a clear goal it’s easy to quit. There is a huge difference between ‘wanting to fit in’ and ‘wanting to have a tight and funny five minute set’.
  • Who Cut the Cheese?: In a group setting anyone could be the culprit! However, standing alone on stage it is easier, in fact necessary, to isolate your mistakes. When the energy shifts and the audience seems bored or annoyed, you know who’s to blame. And if you don’t want to make the same mistake again you have to figure out what it was and why.
  • Intentionally Creating Likability: In order to stand alone and successfully preform comedy to a group of unknowns, it’s important to get them ‘on your side’. This doesn’t mean being sweet and kind, but it does mean being likable. As a stand-up comedian you create your persona, and in a desire to be well received it is a wonderful opportunity to discover the part of you that connects with others and is likable!
  • Funny about Follow Up: Follow up calls and appointments with comedy club owners, bookers etc., will help put the skills learned on stage into action. It is a wonderful next step before attempting hanging out in a group. Again, having a clear goal regarding what you want to get out of the conversation helps when learning social basics.

The world of stand-up comedy is filled with socially challenged folks. Autism, ADHD, Bi Polar, Tourette’s Syndrome—this is a surprisingly effective therapy when married with intention and support. Lynette Louise will happily gift your audience with the understanding to supply that support. Laughing all the while!

Global autism expert, Lynette Louise, raised eight children –six adopted and four of whom were on the spectrum of autism. She was able to guide all but one out of autism and into independence. Lynette travels internationally, performing and speaking on the subject of autism and the efficacy of neurofeedback (biofeedback for the brain). Offering play therapy, family dynamics counseling and neurofeedback– she effectively helps parents become confident experts in their family’s healing. She is the author of the inspirational and honest new book MIRACLES ARE MADE: A Real Life Guide to Autism.

Contact: Lynette Louise MS, BCN-T, CBS PhD in M.O.M, 713-213-7682, mom4evermore@juno.com, www.lynettelouise.com

THE AUTISM WE DON’T SEE

Clean-up on Isle twelve: What to do when you run into a possible autism melt down

A segment on autism is coming up on your local news show and you’re thinking, ‘let’s see what all of the buzz is about’. Soon you are presented with a short piece featuring a child that is adorable and quirky and a family that is distraught and exhausted. Now that you are educated on the disorder you go out into the world and judge accordingly.

That is not autism. It’s lovely that we are able to get a glimpse of the higher functioning children as well as the autistic savants, but to stop there is to lose an opportunity. Not only for the families of lower functioning children—and there are many—but also for you. The next time you find yourself at the grocery store and see a mom struggling to get her child to stop pulling off his pants while screaming and pulling his hair you have not been given the tools to understand why nor have you been taught what to do. If you think you’re uncomfortable, you can bet mom is dying to get out of the store as quickly as possible. Now she’s tempted to make choices for the challenged bystander rather than her challenged child.

Global autism expert Lynette Louise will help you to feel comfortable and make choices that will encourage autism outings which are necessary for children to be guided out of this diagnosis. Some autism answers that will help people with and without autism in their daily lives:

  • Smile and make eye contact: Too often in an attempt to keep from sharing our own discomfort with others we look away and pretend nothing is happening. The parent will feel this avoidance and in turn so will the child. Instead, try smiling and letting mom or dad know that you’re comfortable by looking up and out. The more comfortable the parent is the easier it will be on the child. Plus, you will be smiling which feels good!
  • Remember late night snacks: Autistic children and adults are always battling some sort of focus issue. When you find yourself eating to stay awake, you’re compensating and trying to wake up your brain with sugar and digestion. It’s a similar thing for the child pulling his hair. He’s just struggling with life’s demands using a trick he knows works for him.
  • Make friendly conversation with another bystander: Most likely others in the store are wondering what to do. A Friendly, accepting conversation and energy shift will not only give you a chance to share what you know but help the struggling parent and child feel accepted.

If families and their autistic children stay home to avoid catastrophic outings then no one will benefit. On the flipside if we embrace autism and its challenge we will be giving ourselves a beautiful opportunity. Autism is guided toward social comfort by understanding motivators, connecting and raising the bar. Truthfully, this is a wonderful way to teach all of our children so … thank you autism!

Global autism expert, Lynette Louise, raised eight children –six adopted and four of whom were on the spectrum of autism. She was able to guide all but one out of autism and into independence. Lynette travels internationally, performing and speaking on the subject of autism and the efficacy of neurofeedback. She is the author of the inspirational and honest book MIRACLES ARE MADE: A Real Life Guide to Autism and host of the surprising podcast A NEW SPIN ON AUTISM: ANSWERS!

Contact: Lynette Louise MS, BCN-T, CBS PhD in M.O.M, 713-213-7682, mom4evermore@juno.com, www.lynettelouise.com , www.brainbody.net